Help for Kids and Parents Video BLOG

Parent sent picture of kid reading after help for kids and parents

A mother sent this to me after she used our services.

Child’s Academic Success Both at Home and School

Why Brain Gym for Dyslexia
Hardly anyone comes to me out of sheer curiosity or just the desire to maybe  “make life a little better.” Often, in a fit of desperation, parents come to me after they’ve tried basically everything else they can think of or that has been offered to them. The simple exercises, which comprises a tremendous amount of our blog posts, has helped children learn across the board, but especially children who struggle with some form of dyslexia. 

Dancing in the land of denial.

Let’s discuss one thing I see over and over and over again and the consequences tragic in the end.  Parents, for one reason or another, do not want to think their child could be dyslexic. Please see our download page on dyslexia. Highly intelligent children have dyslexia. Too many children needlessly suffer their way through school and life. They develop many skills to compensate.  The reality is as many as one in five children have some form of dyslexia. It is nothing to be afraid of and really not a big deal when faced and addressed. Parents kind of wring their hands and push the idea out of their heads. The videos below are so super random and off the cuff – you can do the most basic of movements to enable the right and left side of the brain to develop new neural pathways and begin to process information like a “typically developing child.”  Leverage what the school offers, and accept help, it seriously is no big deal. It becomes a big deal when you, the parent, cannot cry to yourself for a moment and then circle the wagons and help your child.

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ADHD and Focus

Self Regulation

 

How Contra Lateral Activities help Dyslexia Article with citations

Performing simple contra lateral activities can be an effective way to increase neuroplasticity and help individuals with dyslexia. Neuroplasticity refers to the brain’s ability to change and adapt in response to new experiences, and contra lateral activities are exercises that involve using both sides of the body in a coordinated way. These activities can help to activate and strengthen the connections between the two hemispheres of the brain, which can in turn improve cognitive function and reduce stress.

One of the primary benefits of contra lateral activities is their ability to reduce the fight or flight response that individuals with dyslexia often experience when trying to read, write, or speak in public. When we are stressed, our bodies go into a heightened state of alert, which can make it more difficult to access and process information. By engaging in simple exercises that involve using both sides of the body in a coordinated way, individuals with dyslexia can help to calm their nervous system and reduce the physical and emotional symptoms of stress.

Examples of contra lateral activities include walking, swimming, dancing, and playing sports that involve using both sides of the body, such as tennis or basketball. These activities can be done alone or in a group setting, and they can be customized to meet the individual needs and preferences of each person. For example, someone who enjoys music might prefer to engage in contra lateral activities that involve dancing or playing an instrument, while someone who enjoys being outdoors might prefer to go for a walk or a hike.

It is important to note that not everyone has access to or is physically able to engage in activities such as swimming, sports, or hiking. However, there are still many other ways to perform simple contra lateral exercises that can be effective in increasing neuroplasticity and helping individuals with dyslexia. “Brain Gym” activities such as Cooks Hook-ups, Cross Crawls, and Alphabet 8’s (as described in the book Brain Gym, Simple Activities for Whole Brain Learning) are great examples of such exercises. Additionally, there are many simple exercises demonstrated on this Dismantling Dyslexia YouTube channel that can be done at home or in a classroom setting with minimal equipment or space needed.

Research has shown that performing contra lateral activities on a regular basis can lead to improvements in a wide range of cognitive functions, including memory, attention, and problem-solving. These activities can also help to increase neuroplasticity, which can help individuals with dyslexia to create new neural pathways and improve their ability to access and process information. By incorporating simple contra lateral exercises into their daily routine, individuals with dyslexia can take an active role in managing their condition and improving their overall cognitive health

Kandel, E.R., Schwartz, J.H., & Jessell, T.M. (2000). Principles of neural science (4th ed.). McGraw-Hill Medical. (Chapter 51: Experience and the modification of synaptic strengths, pp. 1284-1303).

Snowling, M.J. (2000). Dyslexia (2nd ed.). Wiley-Blackwell. (Chapter 3: Cognitive profiles and reading skills, pp. 54-87).

Rae, C., Harasty, J., & Dzendrowskyj, T.E. (2002). An investigation of brain organization and structure in dyslexia using magnetic resonance imaging. Archives of Neurology, 59(5), 780-785.

Vidyasagar, T.R. (2005). Attentional mechanisms in dyslexia: A review and synthesis. Brain and Language, 94(2), 150-178.

Shaywitz, S.E., & Shaywitz, B.A. (2008). Paying attention to reading: The neurobiology of reading and dyslexia. Developmental Psychopathology, 20(4), 1329-1349.

 

helpforkidsandparents.com 

How Contra Lateral Activities help Dyslexia Article with citations

Performing simple contra lateral activities can be an effective way to increase neuroplasticity and help individuals with dyslexia. Neuroplasticity refers to the brain’s ability to change and adapt in response to new experiences, and contra lateral activities are exercises that involve using both sides of the body in a coordinated way. These activities can help to activate and strengthen the connections between the two hemispheres of the brain, which can in turn improve cognitive function and reduce stress.

One of the primary benefits of contra lateral activities is their ability to reduce the fight or flight response that individuals with dyslexia often experience when trying to read, write, or speak in public. When we are stressed, our bodies go into a heightened state of alert, which can make it more difficult to access and process information. By engaging in simple exercises that involve using both sides of the body in a coordinated way, individuals with dyslexia can help to calm their nervous system and reduce the physical and emotional symptoms of stress.

Examples of contra lateral activities include walking, swimming, dancing, and playing sports that involve using both sides of the body, such as tennis or basketball. These activities can be done alone or in a group setting, and they can be customized to meet the individual needs and preferences of each person. For example, someone who enjoys music might prefer to engage in contra lateral activities that involve dancing or playing an instrument, while someone who enjoys being outdoors might prefer to go for a walk or a hike.

It is important to note that not everyone has access to or is physically able to engage in activities such as swimming, sports, or hiking. However, there are still many other ways to perform simple contra lateral exercises that can be effective in increasing neuroplasticity and helping individuals with dyslexia. “Brain Gym” activities such as Cooks Hook-ups, Cross Crawls, and Alphabet 8’s (as described in the book Brain Gym, Simple Activities for Whole Brain Learning) are great examples of such exercises. Additionally, there are many simple exercises demonstrated on this Dismantling Dyslexia YouTube channel that can be done at home or in a classroom setting with minimal equipment or space needed.

Research has shown that performing contra lateral activities on a regular basis can lead to improvements in a wide range of cognitive functions, including memory, attention, and problem-solving. These activities can also help to increase neuroplasticity, which can help individuals with dyslexia to create new neural pathways and improve their ability to access and process information. By incorporating simple contra lateral exercises into their daily routine, individuals with dyslexia can take an active role in managing their condition and improving their overall cognitive health

Kandel, E.R., Schwartz, J.H., & Jessell, T.M. (2000). Principles of neural science (4th ed.). McGraw-Hill Medical. (Chapter 51: Experience and the modification of synaptic strengths, pp. 1284-1303).

Snowling, M.J. (2000). Dyslexia (2nd ed.). Wiley-Blackwell. (Chapter 3: Cognitive profiles and reading skills, pp. 54-87).

Rae, C., Harasty, J., & Dzendrowskyj, T.E. (2002). An investigation of brain organization and structure in dyslexia using magnetic resonance imaging. Archives of Neurology, 59(5), 780-785.

Vidyasagar, T.R. (2005). Attentional mechanisms in dyslexia: A review and synthesis. Brain and Language, 94(2), 150-178.

Shaywitz, S.E., & Shaywitz, B.A. (2008). Paying attention to reading: The neurobiology of reading and dyslexia. Developmental Psychopathology, 20(4), 1329-1349.

 

helpforkidsandparents.com 

How Contra Lateral Activities help Dyslexia Article with citations

Performing simple contra lateral activities can be an effective way to increase neuroplasticity and help individuals with dyslexia. Neuroplasticity refers to the brain’s ability to change and adapt in response to new experiences, and contra lateral activities are exercises that involve using both sides of the body in a coordinated way. These activities can help to activate and strengthen the connections between the two hemispheres of the brain, which can in turn improve cognitive function and reduce stress.

One of the primary benefits of contra lateral activities is their ability to reduce the fight or flight response that individuals with dyslexia often experience when trying to read, write, or speak in public. When we are stressed, our bodies go into a heightened state of alert, which can make it more difficult to access and process information. By engaging in simple exercises that involve using both sides of the body in a coordinated way, individuals with dyslexia can help to calm their nervous system and reduce the physical and emotional symptoms of stress.

Examples of contra lateral activities include walking, swimming, dancing, and playing sports that involve using both sides of the body, such as tennis or basketball. These activities can be done alone or in a group setting, and they can be customized to meet the individual needs and preferences of each person. For example, someone who enjoys music might prefer to engage in contra lateral activities that involve dancing or playing an instrument, while someone who enjoys being outdoors might prefer to go for a walk or a hike.

It is important to note that not everyone has access to or is physically able to engage in activities such as swimming, sports, or hiking. However, there are still many other ways to perform simple contra lateral exercises that can be effective in increasing neuroplasticity and helping individuals with dyslexia. “Brain Gym” activities such as Cooks Hook-ups, Cross Crawls, and Alphabet 8’s (as described in the book Brain Gym, Simple Activities for Whole Brain Learning) are great examples of such exercises. Additionally, there are many simple exercises demonstrated on this Dismantling Dyslexia YouTube channel that can be done at home or in a classroom setting with minimal equipment or space needed.

Research has shown that performing contra lateral activities on a regular basis can lead to improvements in a wide range of cognitive functions, including memory, attention, and problem-solving. These activities can also help to increase neuroplasticity, which can help individuals with dyslexia to create new neural pathways and improve their ability to access and process information. By incorporating simple contra lateral exercises into their daily routine, individuals with dyslexia can take an active role in managing their condition and improving their overall cognitive health

Kandel, E.R., Schwartz, J.H., & Jessell, T.M. (2000). Principles of neural science (4th ed.). McGraw-Hill Medical. (Chapter 51: Experience and the modification of synaptic strengths, pp. 1284-1303).

Snowling, M.J. (2000). Dyslexia (2nd ed.). Wiley-Blackwell. (Chapter 3: Cognitive profiles and reading skills, pp. 54-87).

Rae, C., Harasty, J., & Dzendrowskyj, T.E. (2002). An investigation of brain organization and structure in dyslexia using magnetic resonance imaging. Archives of Neurology, 59(5), 780-785.

Vidyasagar, T.R. (2005). Attentional mechanisms in dyslexia: A review and synthesis. Brain and Language, 94(2), 150-178.

Shaywitz, S.E., & Shaywitz, B.A. (2008). Paying attention to reading: The neurobiology of reading and dyslexia. Developmental Psychopathology, 20(4), 1329-1349.

 

helpforkidsandparents.com

 

 

Reading Fluency

 

Focus and Comprehension

I had a 6-year-old student, who was not gaining ground with phonics or phonemic awareness, (the dynamics that letters make words), let alone making sense of these words. She would struggle to sound out letters and couldn’t read to save her life. What was happening?  Well, the left and right sides of the brain were unable to process and retain the information she was “learning.”  This precious child was willing to capitulate to the idea that she just could not do what the other kids could.

Within days of these movements, her recall improved. Within one month, she was sounding out words and reading.  She was so excited at this new horizon opening up for her, she began to grab anything and everything that was of interest to her and was determined to learn more about it as she developed the skills she needed to open up a new world to herself.  This was a gifted child who was so lost in that miserable world of dyslexia that so often paralyzes some of our most gifted children.    

 

Here are some other YouTube views for you.  https://youtu.be/eUV6xHYH3CU?si=Hqvilp8yYEhYlY33

Swoosh and Hookup


Synthesizing Information

Swoosh

Gemma shows how you can Read Faster, Overcome Attention Deficit Disorder obstacles, and perform your best in school. Dyslexia is no longer a bad word. it becomes a strength in the eyes of those who live in this world. The most brilliant of minds live in the world of dyslexia with 1 in 5 children suffering from an undiagnosed phenomenon. ADHD is yet another cringe-worthy label parents and families find repellent, but it need not be. Empowering anyone with simple brain connection movement.

Swoosh

Reading Comprehension and Recall. 

Synthesizing Information and Recall in Math and Reading

Buzz Lite Year I

Synthesizing Information

Buzz Lite Year II

Synthesizing Information

Mirror Another Hookup


Synthesizing information and recall

Letter Formation

Automaticity in Academics and in Sports Coordination

Want your child to be able easily recall multiplication facts? Want your Child to crush it on the soccer field? This movement can be seen in Ted Lasso Season 1 Episode 4 – when the team is on the soccer field.

Teddy Lassos Skip Hop

 

Teddy Lassos Skip Hop

 

Applying Information and Quick Reflexes and Action

 

I made this video one morning in the middle of nowhere. It can be done first thing in the morning or before a sports Activity, Even before homework time. It will greatly help with Quick Action and Reflexes.

Calm

Calm

Calms CNS

Rattlesnakes and Mirrors are both “Hookups”.

Try to always end any movement session with one or both of these “hookups.”

ADHD and focus for children can be difficult. Quick methods to help with reading, dyslexia, and overall performance in school can be found here. Can your child focus at school or at home. Struggling to find easy methods to make reading fun. Want to find easy ways to make any kind of homework or make fun. This simple exercise will work miracles. Test taking can be made easy and anxiety free. Goals for IEP, Individualized Education Plan can be achieved. New Neural pathways are created in the brain for faster learning and retention of what is learned in school.Memory is greatly improved. Special Education no longer becomes a bad word or stigma. Embrace the gifts your child brings to the table and empower them to learn to their full capacity. Teach me to their strengths. Reading, math, and all homework becomes fun and easy.

Hold the Phone!

I was talking with a friend the other day and… well we were discussing the videos on this site. I mentioned dyslexia. I was shocked at his response.  He said, “I always took being smart for granted.”  I sat there dumbfounded. First of all, children with dyslexia are VERY SMART, that is what makes this such a tragic epidemic. These children are not readily identified. Dyslexia presents itself in over 100 different ways. There is no one or two or even three absolutes in understanding or diagnosing dyslexia. It is a combination of characteristics and performance. Thus making it a very hard learning disability to address and fix.  The videos are such a short cut to years of crafted dyslexia programs children do in school and with private companies. I can promise you, even when you do these movements, you, too will notice changes in yourself.  Please still participate in any and all programs offered to you to help your child with dyslexia. Please participate in these exercises in addition to what is available to your within your learning community.

dyslexia help for kids and parents

Calming Kids

The Grandpa

Calms CNS

Pancake

Calms CNS

Reading Dyslexia -This helps keep the eyes from jumping across the page.

 

 

 

This video captures what so many parents feel like. Frazzled over worked and worried about their kid in general and in School. Grabbing, even skimming a good parenting Book will be a tremendous help. Personally I like Michael Gurian as he discusses the actual brain and the wide and varied needs children have within normal brain development. I hope the books help you as much as they helped me.

Helping students with Dyslexia

What I often found out was

  • They had undiagnosed dyslexia.
  • They suffered with one form or the other of Add or ADHD
  • Some had suffered an early childhood trauma that was still affecting them, whether physical such as birth trauma or defects, to loss of family or close friend and loved one.
  • Had daily duress that wasn’t acknowledged and recognized and they felt a feeling of alienation that they were  alone in their world of suffering to fix themselves… somehow.
  • How in the world can any child be expected to learn when the most basic of cerebral needs were in a constant state of adapting and figuring out coping skills to function in the most basic of ways.  Yet, it was my job to make sure this very thing happened.
  • The proof of the efficacy was in my students as each teacher would come to me and ask what I was doing that this student or that student as they are now so much more attentive and performing at “grade level.”
  • These exercises are meant for “in addition to,” not in place of carefully crafted lessons with district adopted curriculum and assessments. 
  • The brain works in the most intricate of ways and will need this consistency in instruction to create the neural pathways it needs to make the connections and continue learning.
  • The exercises in this blog are to help open the neural pathways and pave the way to easy learning